Why You Need to Think About Eye Tracking

Want to know if you’re catching your consumer’s eye? New advancements in eye tracking technology can reveal how.

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How to Find and Use Your Content Essentials: A Template and Step-by-Step Guide

content-essentials

I hate shopping, and I have a limited fashion sense. So when a friend offered to help me shop for wardrobe essentials that I could mix and match to suit almost any occasion, I wholeheartedly agreed. These staples have been so helpful in many ways.

Now I no longer spend time thinking about what to wear and I don’t constantly second-guess myself. Packing is not a nightmare because I don’t have to try on a bunch of things that are “meh” and “good enough.” A wardrobe of staples has saved me so much time, and I feel much more confident.

Do you want to regain some time — and come across as more put together? Let me help you put together your content essentials.

What are content essentials?

Content essentials are those pieces of content that work well in many situations. In short, they are the best version of your brand. Another way to look at it: Your content essentials are the 20% of your content that gives you 80% of results.


Your #content essentials are the 20% of your content that gives you 80% of results via @michelelinn.
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Content essentials don’t need to be only blog posts, they can be e-books, videos, or any other type. They are the pieces that your audience loves time and time again.

How do you find your essential content?

Your audience indicates their love for your content essentials through engagement — they are your conversion champions (hat tip to Andy Crestodina who coined this phrase.)

Your conversion champions are those pages or posts that have the highest percentage of traffic converting to something. In CMI’s case, I look at conversions to email subscribers, but for you it could be items added to the shopping cart.

Andy explains how to find your conversion champions in No. 2 in this post: 3 Internal Linking Strategies for SEO and Conversions.

How do I keep track of my content essentials?

Once you identify what your essentials are, keep them in a central spot (consider this your brand’s content closet). Not only will this help everyone on the team share the best of your brand, but you can also make a note to revisit these essentials to make sure they continue to showcase the best your brand has to offer. (Not to take this wardrobe analogy too far, but you know how you may love something one season, but when you revisit it the following year … not so much?)

I like to track our content essentials in a simple spreadsheet, but you could use any system you like. You can view and save your own copy of this template if helpful:

  • Go to File > Make a Copy and save it as a new Google spreadsheet.
  • Go to File > Download As > Microsoft Excel to save it as an Excel spreadsheet.

You can customize this template of course, but I track the following:

  • Name of the content essential – Record the title of your blog post, e-book, etc.
  • URL – If this piece lives in multiple places, choose one location.
  • Category – If your site has categories or other taxonomy, track the best place for each content essential. That way, if you are looking for content to support one of your categories, you can easily scan the list to find a good match. (And, if you find you don’t have a content essential in one of your categories, there is a great opportunity to create one.)
  • Date of review – Track when you last evaluated the content essential so you can easily see when you need to take another look. I highly recommend reviewing your content essential in batches with pre-determined regularity.
  • Calls to action (optional) – Keep a list of a few CTA options for your blog posts so you can easily include them in posts. (At CMI, we keep our CTAs in a separate list, so I don’t duplicate them here, but if you don’t have a CTA list, it may be useful to centralize them here.)
  • Notes – I like to have a catch-all space for any other details the team should know about this piece such as when it will be updated.

content-essentials

Click to enlarge

What can you do with these content essentials?

Your content essentials are the best version of your brand, and you want to promote and distribute them as much as you can. Here are several suggestions:

  • Put them on high-traffic pages.
  • Add them as CTAs to relevant blog posts.
  • Update and republish them (annually is often a good cadence but see what works for your audience).
  • Aggregate them into e-books
  • Break them out into other content. (Here are 10 ideas on how to atomize your content.)
  • Re-share them on social. (Bonus tip: Use BuzzSumo to see which posts are popular on which platforms so you can put your money behind the right social channels.)
  • Curate your essentials into collections, hubs, or posts.
  • Study them to understand what your audience truly craves. (More on that below.)

Promote & distribute your #content essentials as much as you can says @michelelinn.
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But, remember: Your content essentials need to make sense in the context of wherever you place them. Just because your go-to outfit is a black dress, it doesn’t mean it makes sense at a BBQ.

Will people get bored of seeing the same stuff?

Are you thinking, “This all sounds great, but how much should I really do with one piece of content? Will my audience think I don’t have much in my content closet?”

First, look to see how many people are new to your content essential. To find out, go to Audience > Overview in Google Analytics and look at the info for returning vs. new visitor. You’ll likely see you have a lot of new people coming to your website.

In short, use your content essentials where they are most relevant, and while your loyal audience may see them time-and-time again, you’ll impress the new people you meet. (And, wouldn’t you rather wear a great outfit you have worn before rather than something “meh” that people haven’t seen?)

What are the other benefits of studying your essentials?

Essentials give you mental space

Now that I have my clothing staples, I still spend some time deciding what to wear to an event, but it’s so much easier. I have more time to focus on things that really matter.

How this applies to your content: Who doesn’t want more time? Or more specifically, who doesn’t want the mental space to think about new things in a different way? Having content essentials lets you do exactly that: focus on something important instead of reinventing your go-to content.

Essentials help you get a sense of style

Not only do I now have a small selection of basics that give me mental space, but now that I know what types of essentials suit me, I shop more efficiently to find other essentials to add to my wardrobe (no to crew necks, but yes on scoop necks).

How this applies to your content: Do you want to have content your audience would miss if it were gone? Study your content essentials to see what format your audience craves. You’ll start to see themes emerge. Is it a template? An e-book? A how-to video? Create more of those types of things.

Fill in editorial gaps instead of creating the same ol’ content

Before my wardrobe-essential shopping trip, I bought what was in my comfort zone. The result was that my closet was brimming with too much of the same stuff. Yes, there are some essentials of which you can use multiples (think: white T-shirts, jeans, black leggings), but you need other pieces to tie it all together.

How this applies to your content: Do you have one area covered so well in your editorial but continue to write about it because it’s comfortable? Chances are that new same-topic content isn’t doing your brand that much good because it gets swallowed by your older content or cannibalizes that older content that worked well. In short, figure out what you have and then figure out what you need — and focus on those gaps.

What’s key for me to remember?

You need a list of your content essentials because it will save you time, present a more confident view, and help you get more bang with your content marketing. Tracking them in a shared spreadsheet or some other tool will help you stay organized and keep your team on the same page.

Would love to know if you are doing something similar. Let me know in the comments.

And a special shout-out to Lisa Dougherty who runs this blog. She was the go-to friend who helped my wardrobe and turned a shopping trip into content marketing inspiration.

Looking for more templates? Check out our collection of 23 checklists, templates, and guides. (And, I’ll let you in on something: This post is one of our content essentials; we update it annually.)

Cover image by Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute

The post How to Find and Use Your Content Essentials: A Template and Step-by-Step Guide appeared first on Content Marketing Institute.

10 Tips for Increasing Small Business Efficiency

10-tips-small-business-efficiencyEfficiency is an important part of running a small business. When you have fewer resources than large companies, you need to be able to get more done with less. There are ways to increase efficiency in all areas of your business, as members of our small business community have learned. See some of their top tips in the list below.

Learn the Power of Personal Branding

If you want to be a successful entrepreneur, it’s not enough to simply brand your business. You also need to consider your own personal branding. You can learn a bit about personal branding from the experts included in this post by Dipti Parmar on Preceptist .

Get Stuff Done With Productivity Tools

Want to get more done in less time? There are plenty of different productivity tools out there that entrepreneurs can benefit from. Some small business experts shared their favorites in this post on Tina’s Blog. We were thrilled to have Small Business Trends’ publisher and CEO Anita Campbell included.

Network a Conference Like a Jedi

When attending conferences for your business, networking is a must. And if you really want to help your business, you need to learn how to network like a Jedi, which you can do with the tips in this Content Marketing Institute post by Aaron Orendorff. You can also see discussion surrounding the post over on BizSugar.

Protect Your Business from Phishing Scams

Phishing scams can really harm small businesses. But if you know how to protect your business and data, you can really decrease your chances of seeing any negative impact. This post by Ramon Ray of SmallBizTechnology includes some tips to help your small business avoid phishing scams.

This article, “10 Tips for Increasing Small Business Efficiency” was first published on Small Business Trends

Published on Nov 22, 2013

Learn more Small Business Coaching strategies for your business: http://socialmediatopteam.com/Small-B… | Social Media Top Team | (855)686-7832 for a FREE 30 Minute Small Business Coaching Consultation

If you want to get coaching on 10 FAST Tips To Grow Your Small Business To The Next Level and how you can improve your small business, then you are at the right place. This highly informative video starts off by providing an easy to remember small business coaching overview of ten key essentials that thriving businesses and their employees are practicing. Though there are many videos out there providing small business coaching few actually show you step by step how to properly use time tested, business proven small business coaching strategies effectively to acquire more market share and GREATLY improving your customer satisfaction for growing your small business.

The post 10 Tips for Increasing Small Business Efficiency is republished from Content Curation Course

10 Tips for Increasing Small Business Efficiency syndicated from http://www.contentkingpin.com

Defeat Your Most Dangerous Writing Habit

“The Curse of Knowledge”

Published on Apr 9, 2016

Ever have an “expert” try to explain something to you, only to be left more confused than when you started?

They’d forgotten how to be a beginner… and lost most of the ability to teach along the way… here’s how to not make the same mistake yourself.

MORE VIDEOS and GOODIES: http://www.jeffwalker.com
LAUNCH YOUR BUSINESS: http://www.productlaunchformula.com

curse-of-knowledgeWhat is “The Curse of Knowledge?”

If you’re “Cursed,” then you are unable to imagine what it’s like not to know or understand something — a topic, discipline, craft, what have you — which, in turn, makes it hard to communicate that knowledge to less-informed people.

In their book, Made to Stick, the Heath Brothers provide a typical example:

Think of a lawyer who can’t give you a straight, comprehensible answer to a legal question. His vast knowledge and experience renders him unable to fathom how little you know. So when he talks to you, he talks in abstractions that you can’t follow. And we’re all like the lawyer in our own domain of expertise.”

That said, let’s set the anecdotal evidence aside and focus on the science:7 Ways to Lift the Curse of Knowledge

1) Know your audience’s base subject knowledge.

How well your audience understands your subject should shape the way you approach it.

So, do your research. If their base subject knowledge is high, feel free to skip the fundamentals. If their base knowledge is low, or nonexistent, start from the beginning — start at thirty thousand feet and parachute down, slowly, gradually.

To figure out your audience’s base knowledge, try creating a detailed target persona. It’s not that hard and it’ll give you the background you need to write in a way people understand and appreciate.

2) Tone down your vocabulary.

Peppering your writing with idioms, jargon, and big, fancy words is like saying: If you don’t understand this, maybe you shouldn’t be reading it. Stop while you’re ahead. Thanks for playing.

That’s a nasty vibe, if you ask me. Plus, if people can’t understand you, they’ll inevitably tune out and turn off. And then what will you do? For example, this is:

  • Bad: “Let’s open the Kimono, take a peek at the email CTR, and break down scalable successes.”
  • Better: “Let’s look at the data, evaluate the email clickthrough rate, and capitalize on what’s working.”
  • Best: “Let’s see how many people opened our emails and do more of what works.”

3) Tell a story.

Before writing existed, people used stories to keep history. For thousands of years, stories helped us spread information. Today, stories remain just as psychologically impactful as they did back then. As Jonathan Gottschall explains in his book, The Storytelling Animal, human beings are natural storytellers. Stories are a fundamental piece of our genome.

We love stories because they help us see the world through different lenses. We love stories so much, in fact, that we naturally inject ourselves into their narratives, hijacking characters’ circumstances, emotions, and learnings.

Of course, stories also maintain an order. They have a beginning, a middle, and an end, which makes it hard for the Curse to sneak its way in, leaving people out of context and confused.

4) Ditch the abstractions.

Leaders often speak in abstractions because their experience helps them visualize broad concepts. For example, we can all imagine a Chief Customer Officer saying something like:

Our mission is to provide callers with the best customer service they’ve ever experienced.”

That’s great and all, but what does it mean? And how does a statement like that differentiate you from the competition? It doesn’t. These days, differentiating yourself in a crowded space means getting specific, like this:

Our mission is to answer every phone call to the customer service department within three rings and to resolve non-emergency calls within 6 minutes.”

Be concrete. It’s comforting to people.

5) Provide examples.

Unlike abstractions, examples put concepts into perspective.

An example could take the form of a metaphor or a simile. As long as it paints a picture, it’s doing its job. In any case, examples make sense of things, using information we already understand to forge connections.

For instance, when my grandma Sofia didn’t understand what a blog was, I explained it to her in terms I knew she’d be familiar with: “It’s like a journal or a magazine,” I said, “but you can only read the articles on the internet.”

6) Use visuals.

About 65% of people are visual learners, meaning they absorb information better and faster when images are used to explain it.

Hence: PowerPoint presentations, infographics, and those quirky, mesmerizing whiteboard videos you’ve seen. These are all examples of compelling visual content being used to engage and educate people from the boardroom to the web page. Incorporating these and other visual components into your messaging is a potent way to appeal to nearly a third of your audience.

7) Get an outside point-of-view.

You write. You edit. You reread, rearrange, reformat. You repeat.

That’s writing — and it can be an intense process, which, sometimes, leaves your message over-processed. In other words, it’s possible to overthink something, twisting it up until you’re the only person who gets it.

A good editor will alert you to this issue. Don’t know any editors? That’s okay. Ask a friend to give your writing a once over. They may not be your target audience but they can still serve as a barometer for comprehension.

This text was syndicated from an article here

Defeat Your Most Dangerous Writing Habit syndicated from http://www.contentkingpin.com

Defeat Your Most Dangerous Writing Habit

“The Curse of Knowledge”

Published on Apr 9, 2016

Ever have an “expert” try to explain something to you, only to be left more confused than when you started?

They’d forgotten how to be a beginner… and lost most of the ability to teach along the way… here’s how to not make the same mistake yourself.

MORE VIDEOS and GOODIES: http://www.jeffwalker.com
LAUNCH YOUR BUSINESS: http://www.productlaunchformula.com

 

curse-of-knowledgeWhat is “The Curse of Knowledge?”

If you’re “Cursed,” then you are unable to imagine what it’s like not to know or understand something — a topic, discipline, craft, what have you — which, in turn, makes it hard to communicate that knowledge to less-informed people.

In their book, Made to Stick, the Heath Brothers provide a typical example:

Think of a lawyer who can’t give you a straight, comprehensible answer to a legal question. His vast knowledge and experience renders him unable to fathom how little you know. So when he talks to you, he talks in abstractions that you can’t follow. And we’re all like the lawyer in our own domain of expertise.”

That said, let’s set the anecdotal evidence aside and focus on the science:7 Ways to Lift the Curse of Knowledge

1) Know your audience’s base subject knowledge.

How well your audience understands your subject should shape the way you approach it.

So, do your research. If their base subject knowledge is high, feel free to skip the fundamentals. If their base knowledge is low, or nonexistent, start from the beginning — start at thirty thousand feet and parachute down, slowly, gradually.

To figure out your audience’s base knowledge, try creating a detailed target persona. It’s not that hard and it’ll give you the background you need to write in a way people understand and appreciate.

2) Tone down your vocabulary.

Peppering your writing with idioms, jargon, and big, fancy words is like saying: If you don’t understand this, maybe you shouldn’t be reading it. Stop while you’re ahead. Thanks for playing.

That’s a nasty vibe, if you ask me. Plus, if people can’t understand you, they’ll inevitably tune out and turn off. And then what will you do? For example, this is:

  • Bad: “Let’s open the Kimono, take a peek at the email CTR, and break down scalable successes.”
  • Better: “Let’s look at the data, evaluate the email clickthrough rate, and capitalize on what’s working.”
  • Best: “Let’s see how many people opened our emails and do more of what works.”

3) Tell a story.

Before writing existed, people used stories to keep history. For thousands of years, stories helped us spread information. Today, stories remain just as psychologically impactful as they did back then. As Jonathan Gottschall explains in his book, The Storytelling Animal, human beings are natural storytellers. Stories are a fundamental piece of our genome.

We love stories because they help us see the world through different lenses. We love stories so much, in fact, that we naturally inject ourselves into their narratives, hijacking characters’ circumstances, emotions, and learnings.

Of course, stories also maintain an order. They have a beginning, a middle, and an end, which makes it hard for the Curse to sneak its way in, leaving people out of context and confused.

4) Ditch the abstractions.

Leaders often speak in abstractions because their experience helps them visualize broad concepts. For example, we can all imagine a Chief Customer Officer saying something like:

Our mission is to provide callers with the best customer service they’ve ever experienced.”

That’s great and all, but what does it mean? And how does a statement like that differentiate you from the competition? It doesn’t. These days, differentiating yourself in a crowded space means getting specific, like this:

Our mission is to answer every phone call to the customer service department within three rings and to resolve non-emergency calls within 6 minutes.”

Be concrete. It’s comforting to people.

5) Provide examples.

Unlike abstractions, examples put concepts into perspective.

An example could take the form of a metaphor or a simile. As long as it paints a picture, it’s doing its job. In any case, examples make sense of things, using information we already understand to forge connections.

For instance, when my grandma Sofia didn’t understand what a blog was, I explained it to her in terms I knew she’d be familiar with: “It’s like a journal or a magazine,” I said, “but you can only read the articles on the internet.”

6) Use visuals.

About 65% of people are visual learners, meaning they absorb information better and faster when images are used to explain it.

Hence: PowerPoint presentations, infographics, and those quirky, mesmerizing whiteboard videos you’ve seen. These are all examples of compelling visual content being used to engage and educate people from the boardroom to the web page. Incorporating these and other visual components into your messaging is a potent way to appeal to nearly a third of your audience.

7) Get an outside point-of-view.

You write. You edit. You reread, rearrange, reformat. You repeat.

That’s writing — and it can be an intense process, which, sometimes, leaves your message over-processed. In other words, it’s possible to overthink something, twisting it up until you’re the only person who gets it.

A good editor will alert you to this issue. Don’t know any editors? That’s okay. Ask a friend to give your writing a once over. They may not be your target audience but they can still serve as a barometer for comprehension.

This text was syndicated from an article here

Defeat Your Most Dangerous Writing Habit published first on http://www.seokingpin.com

The Art and Science of Emotional Engagement

art-science-emotional-engagement

Fun fact: Neuro-imagery shows that when evaluating brands, consumers primarily use emotions rather than factual information. This is as true for brand-created content as it is for traditional advertising spots and banners.

We can see the power of emotional content at work in marketing campaigns that went viral. Always’ Like a Girl, Dove’s Real Beauty, and Apple’s Misunderstood campaigns all spring to mind.

But we’ve also seen how emotional content can go terribly awry — like those sad ASPCA commercials with Sarah McLachlan or Nationwide’s Make Safe Happen campaign.

As content creators, emotion can be an incredibly powerful engagement tactic, but we have to use it artfully. Let’s explore the science of emotion and how we can use it in an empathetic way to create more meaningful content.

Science of emotion

Emotional engagement is affected by a number of scientific principles that directly impact content creation. Here are four key areas:

  • Design
  • Color
  • Images
  • Branding

Design

Designs often fall into patterns of sameness around the latest trends. However, designs that evoke the greatest emotional response tend to involve something out of the norm. Elements of surprise can prevent your content from being filtered out by Broca’s area in the brain.


Designs that evoke the greatest emotional response involve something out of the norm says @SFBakerGeek.
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Additionally, introducing schema incongruity — information incongruent to an established schema — has the potential to increase interest, memorability, and persuasiveness in consumers.

As an extreme example, this marketing video for consumer product Squatty Potty went viral precisely because it was so weird and surprising.

Generally, you don’t associate unicorns, ice cream, and English guys in doublets with pooping … and yet, these all feature in Squatty Potty’s video. A bit disturbing? Yes. Memorable? It’s hard to argue with almost 28 million YouTube views. Persuasive? The company sold $15 million in merchandise in 2015.

Color

Color can have a powerful impact on a viewer’s emotional response. Studies have shown that visuals in color can increase people’s willingness to read a piece of content by 80%. Using specific colors can have a significant impact on mood; for example, red evokes strong emotions, while yellow can foster happy feelings, and blue creates a calm, trustworthy atmosphere.


Visuals in color can increase people’s willingness to read a piece of content by 80% via @xerox @SFBakerGeek.
Click To Tweet


Coca-Cola has consistently used red as its brand color. Red not only evokes a strong emotional response, it cultivates a positive, friendly energy that makes consumers want to participate. This recent ad from the Taste the Feeling campaign uses the color red to great effect, drawing attention to the people drinking Cokes and inviting consumers to join the party.

coca-cola-taste-the-feeling-campaign

Virgin America is another brand that consistently uses color in its campaigns. In a recent print ad campaign, the airline used the color purple to cultivate a feeling of exclusivity, luxury, and imaginativeness while maintaining its trademark humorous visual tone.

virgin-america-campaign

Images

A large body of research confirms the emotional power of visuals — Visual Teaching Alliance quotes David Hyerle’s field guide that 90% of all information transmitted to the brain is visual. In fact, images can increase trust and belief in the information being conveyed — a known phenomenon that comedian Stephen Colbert calls the truthiness effect.


Images can increase trust & belief in the information being conveyed via @ResearchDigest.
Click To Tweet


Virtual reality company StoryUp created a highly impactful campaign for the nonprofit organization Central Missouri Honor Flight called Honor Everywhere. Using 360-degree video, it gave veterans a virtual tour of memorial sites in Washington, D.C. By creating such a rich, visual experience for veterans, it also gained a lot of media attention.

Images can also evoke specific emotional responses. For example, photos of people have been shown to increase empathy, and photos of attractive people, especially women, tend to be more engaging than other types of imagery.

In one case study, a South African financial institution sent 50,000 direct mail pieces that featured a photo of a person. In some cases, the person was the same gender as the recipient; in other cases, the person in the photo was the opposite gender. For male customers, using a photo of a female in the offer letter significantly increased take-up; the effect had about as much impact as if the bank offered a drop in the interest rate by 4.5 percentage points.

Branding

Most consumers have an unconscious aversion to being persuaded. When they see a piece of branded content, they become immediately resistant to the message. Experiments have shown that a more subtle inclusion of branding can increase views by as much as 20%.


A subtle inclusion of #branding can increase views by as much as 20% via @harvardbiz.
Click To Tweet


Kate Spade has done a fantastic job of creating content that highlights the brand without explicitly talking about its products in its Miss Adventure series. In the first episode, the story of Anna Kendrick getting locked out of her apartment with her dog takes center stage while Kate Spade’s products are a secondary focus.


.@KateSpade is a great example of content that highlights the brand w/out talking product via @SFBakerGeek.
Click To Tweet


Art of emotion

Knowing the science that impacts our audience’s emotional response is useful. However, it takes an artful approach to turn this science into impactful, engaging content. It’s all too easy for brands to misuse psychological levers in an attempt to make an impact on viewers or readers.

As content creators, how do we walk the line between good emotional engagement and audience manipulation? It takes empathy, continuous refinement, and above all, a relevant story.

1. Start with your audience’s motivation

What does your audience really want from your content: Inspiration? Education? Practical advice? Latest news? Depending on their motivation, the emotions you cultivate and the way you go about cultivating them will differ.

For example, if your audience is interested in inspiration, you’ll want to evoke emotions like awe and curiosity. Conversely, if your audience is interested in financial news, you’ll want to go after a different set of emotions — fear or reassurance, depending on the news.

meditation-app-headspace

Meditation app Headspace uses calming colors and cute line art to tap into the customers’ motivation to live a calmer, happier life.

2. Inspire trust with a believable story

This is where brands often fail when trying to craft emotion-driven content. If your story isn’t believable, your audience won’t trust you. If they don’t trust you, they’ll discount any emotions they feel from your piece. Content from brands is particularly at risk for a knee-jerk emotional shutdown because consumers are used to manipulative advertising tactics that play on their emotions.


If your story isn’t believable, your audience won’t trust you via @SFBakerGeek.
Click To Tweet


To engage viewers, your story has to be relevant, and it has to be genuine.

Kleenex’s Messages of Care campaign highlights meaningful, real-life stories, including this one about a NICU worker in Marietta, Georgia.

3. Invite people to actively participate

The best stories pull in the audience, immersing them in the action. Allowing your viewers to actively participate provides an even deeper channel for emotional connection. With interactive content, you can put people in the driver’s seat, allowing them to follow their own path, answer questions, drill down for more information, and explore topics through multiple lenses or perspectives. This, in turn, provides you with insights on what your audience cares about.

clinique-play-with-pop-campaign

Clinique’s Play with Pop interactive video campaign allows consumers to swap between musical styles and explore related cosmetic collections.

4. Create a full emotional arc

If advertising is a soap-opera episode, your content marketing should be a drama. A quick-hit emotional high may drive engagement fleetingly, but without a thoughtfully crafted emotional arc, your audience will quickly lose interest in your story.

casper-mattress-co

Mattress company Casper manages to fit a full emotional arc into a few panels of a subway ad — impressive.


Without a crafted emotional arc, your audience will quickly lose interest in your story via @SFBakerGeek.
Click To Tweet


5. Use data to optimize your approach

Refining your approach and figuring out the precise topic, tone, and slant that resonates with your audience requires testing. As you publish new content with an emotional thread, look closely at your performance metrics to uncover what’s working and what isn’t.

contently

Content analytics platforms like Contently’s measure content performance by individual piece and by topic, persona, or funnel type, providing data to refine your approach.

Bottom line

Emotion is the key to driving strong engagement with your content. Using the science of emotional resonance and the art of creativity, you can design stories that appeal to your audience in a meaningful, real way. These stories will inspire your audience to share and keep them coming back for more.

Want daily inspiration to improve your content marketing? Subscribe to the free CMI newsletter.

Cover image by Ryan McGuire-Bells Design, Gratisography, via pixabay.com

Please note:  All tools included in our blog posts are suggested by authors, not the CMI editorial team.  No one post can provide all relevant tools in the space. Feel free to include additional tools in the comments (from your company or ones that you have used).

The post The Art and Science of Emotional Engagement appeared first on Content Marketing Institute.